What is diabetes, why should we worry about it, and how to avoid it?

Healthy lifestyle

What is diabetes, why should we worry about it, and how to avoid it?

14 november 2017

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In 1991, the World Health Organization proposed that November 14 be World Diabetes Day. The date was chosen in recognition of the merits of one of the discoverers of insulin, Frederick Bunting. Today is the 126th anniversary of his birth.

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most serious endocrine diseases in the world. But Dr. Colin Campbell is convinced that dietary changes can help diabetic patients.

Two types of diabetes

Almost all cases of diabetes mellitus are of either the first or the second type. Usually, in 5-10% of cases, the first type develops in children and adolescents. The second type, which accounts for 90–95% of cases, occurs in adults over 40 years of age. In recent years, up to 45% of cases of diabetes mellitus in children are related to type 2 diabetes.

What happens to the body?

When a person develops diabetes, their metabolic process goes awry. The body of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus cannot produce enough insulin because they destroy the cells of the pancreas responsible for its production. This occurs as a result of the body attacking itself, making the first type an autoimmune disease.

In type 2 diabetes, insulin is produced, but does not cope with its task: when insulin begins to give orders for the transport of sugar in the blood, the body ignores them, and the metabolism of sugar in the blood is not carried out properly. This is called insulin resistance.


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How to be treated?

Today, there are no medical or surgical methods for treating diabetes mellitus. At best, modern medicines allow diabetics to maintain a sanely functional lifestyle, but fail to address the cause of the disease. Patients are forced to take medications all their lives, which makes diabetes mellitus an extremely costly disease.

there is hope

The food we eat has a huge impact on this disease. Good nutrition helps not only prevent, but also treat, diabetes mellitus.

Studies show that people in countries where diabetes is less common eat differently than people in countries with a higher prevalence of diabetes. In some cultures, food is high in fat, while in others it is high in carbohydrates. This was due to the fact that in some countries the population ate mainly animal food, and in others – plant food.

The food we eat has a huge impact on this disease.  Good nutrition helps not only prevent, but also treat, diabetes mellitus.
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Life-saving nutritional correction

A diet high in carbohydrates and low in fat, that is, plant-based foods, helps to reduce the risk of diabetes. Scientists also found that the greatest correlation is between diabetes and being overweight. The inhabitants of the countries where they ate according to the “Western” type, the level of cholesterol in the blood was the highest, which, in turn, was associated with the occurrence of this disease. Studies were carried out in one population group.

Reducing the consumption of meat, fish, and eggs resulted in improved human health even during short-term experiments. Thanks to an almost vegetarian diet, patients with type 1 diabetes, after just three weeks, were able to reduce the dose of insulin-containing medicines by an average of 40%. Their blood sugar levels have improved significantly. Equally important, cholesterol levels dropped by 30%.

All of this supports the hypothesis that a diet rich in fiber and predominantly whole plant foods protects against diabetes, while animal foods high in fat and protein provoke the development of the disease.

Life-saving nutritional correction
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Some statistics

Diabetes mellitus of the second type, in contrast to the first, responds better to treatment. And when patients with type 2 diabetes were on a high-fiber, low-fat diet, the results were even more impressive. Of the 25 patients, 24 were able to stop taking insulin-containing drugs. One man had diabetes for 21 years and was taking 35 units of insulin a day. After three weeks of intensive dietary treatment, his dose of insulin had dropped to 8 units per day. After another eight weeks at home, he no longer needed insulin injections.

Another group of scientists achieved similar startling results by prescribing a plant-based diet and exercise for a group of patients. Of 40 people who took insulin-containing drugs at the beginning of the course of treatment, 34 were able to completely abandon them after only 26 days 20.

Diabetes mellitus of the second type, in contrast to the first, responds better to treatment.
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Lifestyle changes can seem like an ordeal, and giving up meat can seem stupid and useless. But who wants to fight a chronic disease that cannot be cured and inject insulin every day for the rest of their lives? Try diversifying your diet a little: fewer meats, more fiber and vegetables. At least for the sake of experiment. And don’t get sick!

Based on the book “Chinese Research: Updated and Expanded Edition”.

Post cover: pixabay.

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